The Shocking Differences Seen In a Country the Size of Oregon

This morning I left my site by bush taxi to get to Conakry. With all of our baggage strapped to the roof, we were a packed car. Our chaffeur and a little girl took the driver’s seat, two grown men sat in the passenger’s seat and 4 adults and 3 children snuggled up in the backseat. And a live cow in the trunk. A normal day in Guinea transport.

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Later that same night I visited members of my host-family who had left Koba and moved to Conakry. They turned on the generator for me and we sat under fans on a leather sofa and watched hip hop music videos on a TV nicer than my own back home. Their smart phones and iron charged while we chatted over the hum of the generator and the fans.Image 

Africa is funny.

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4 thoughts on “The Shocking Differences Seen In a Country the Size of Oregon

  1. and the “live” cow was in the trunk why? I assume that if it’s alive, it’s a part of the family… if it’s dead, it’s a part of the family dinner?

  2. Nice post. I saw lots of cows in Guinea, but very little beef and very little dairy. So what DO they do with their cows, other than drive around with them in the trunk?

  3. sounds like you’re having an amazing experience! Ben leaves tomorrow for a few weeks working on a project in Mongolia ( i don’t think he could have gotten farther away from home if he tried!). He hasn’t gotten his first assignment yet, so we don’t know which country he’ll get,,, maybe Philippines, south Africa, or Barbados,, but the list keeps changing. Sandy

  4. The area I live in doesn’t have a lot of cows, we are strict fish folks on the coast. But I’m in Middle Guinea right now and here meat is eaten every meal and fish are expensive. So, it depends on the area of Guinea. There is a lot of dairy and meat out here. I’m a fan of the corn couscous, sour milk, and sugar mixture they sell on the streets.

    And as for the fate of that cow, he was being transported to Conakry to be sold and slaughtered.

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