Conakry, Guinea is HAPPY!

This video has just emerged from Guinea and I couldn’t imagine a better way to show the happiness and energy that radiates from Conakry. Life continues!

Ebola can’t stop the dancing.

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>$20,000 Awarded to 7 NGO’s Fighting Ebola

It’s been awhile since I’ve written. I’ll confess that I haven’t felt inspired. I’m working, spending time with family and friends, enjoying the comforts and freedom that America offers. I’m also really cold.

Like EXTREMELY cold.

But life continues as usual — albeit swaddled in wool sweaters and covered up with glittens. Time continues to march onward and upward, the days are getting shorter and the nights are growing longer and colder.

Ebola’s still out there. As surreal as that statement is for me to make, it’s true. 5,000+ lives have been claimed in West Africa. There’s an alarming decline in U.S. healthcare volunteers signing up to help — likely due to the forced 21-day quarantine that has been placed on some of the heroic people who have given up 6-8 weeks of their paycheck and life to help end an outbreak that is leaving destruction in it’s wake. Fear is a contagion, spiraling out of control across the globe. I lay in bed at night, stare up at my ceiling and quietly ask the universe “why?” and “what can we do to stop this?”

The fire is not out. The fight has not yet been won. We must press forward to end this outbreak at the source. We are all at stake. Outbreaks do not stop at borders.

As I’ve written before, I’m working with the National Peace Corps Association’s Ebola Relief Fund to get money to those fighting Ebola in their home country. Last week we awarded over $20,000 in funding to 7 different NGO’s in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. As they implement and complete their projects they will be sending back evaluation, testimonies, photos, and videos — all of which I will be sure to share with you. We will be awarding a second round of funding in December 2014.

Check out the seven organizations we’ve selected for our first round:

GUINEAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE INCORPORATION OF WOMEN IN THE ELECTORAL PROCESS & GOVERNANCE (AGUIFPEG) — KINDIA, GUINEA

AGUIFPEG is mounting a community awareness campaign in an area where an estimated 75 percent of the population is not literate. The project was awarded $3,000 to educate on Ebola prevention through a theatrical presentation in 4 indigenous languages. Participants will be encouraged to pass on the health information through conversations in their families, bar-cafes, restaurants, markets, fields, mosques, churches and other public places.

AMIS DU MONDE POUR LE DEVELOPPEMENT (AMD) — SAMOÉ, GUINEA

AMD was awarded $2,839 to create awareness of Ebola prevention practices. Team members will establish an information and intervention system using community leaders to encourage healthier personal hygiene and food preparation.

ASSOCIATION GUINEENNE D’EVEIL AU DEVELOPPEMENT DURABLE (AGEDD) — FORECARIAH, GUINEA

AGEDD was awarded $3,000 to conduct sensitizations for teachers in primary schools and the association of parents of Forecariah and Maferinyah in Guinea. Teachers and parent volunteers will be trained to educate their communities while distributing prevention materials (leaflets, soap, chlorine, buckets, kettles).

WOMEN’S CAMPAIGN INTERNATIONAL (WCI) LIBERIAN RURAL WOMEN’S PROGRAM — LIBERIA

The campaign draws on its existing network of local women leaders to form community action committees at the town and clan level in areas affected by Ebola. Communities have fed quarantined families, paid burial teams to remove bodies and distributed prevention information and materials in a dozen communities. NPCA’s award of $3,000 will allow WCI to expand activities to ten more rural communities.

FACE ACTION AFRICA — RIVERCESS COUNTY, LIBERIA

With the $3,000 grant from NPCA, FAA will provide administrative and logistical support to the Rivercess County Health Team, train contact tracers, facilitate the setting up and management of community care centers and the procurement of personal protective equipment for health workers.

ACTION SALONE ON HEALTH & EDUCATION (ASHE) — EASTERN SIERRA LEONE

ASHE was awarded $3,000 to support the work of Sister Josephine Karmara and a community of nuns in Kailahun in ongoing care of children whose parents died of Ebola. Goals are to provide physical and emotional security to the children, feed and care for them in a home-like environment.

SCHOOLS FOR SALONE — SIERRA LEONE

Schools for Salone was awarded $3,000 to help fill the education gap caused by  school closing due to the Ebola epidemic. The project will distribute radios to impoverished communities to allow them access to Ministry of Health daily broadcasts specifically targeting primary school students for three hours in the morning and secondary school students in the afternoon.

Thanks to all donors who have gotten involved. We are committed to sending 100% of your donations to reputable, community-based NGO’s in the affected countries who are working against directly related Ebola issues. As we continue to receive applications from NGO’s, we continue our fundraising efforts stateside. Consider getting involved today to help us fund even more organizations and end Ebola NOW!

Find more information about the NPCA Ebola Relief Fund here and make a donation here.

Updates on Ebola Relief Fund

I won’t go in depth in this post about the severity of the Ebola outbreak.

It’s all over the news.

What is disturbing me is not the U.S. cases of Ebola, but the shift of focus in media coverage.

Our nation has been enveloped in a cloud of paranoia, blinding us of the realities. African communities in the U.S. are being shunned, sent home from work, stigmatized. Groups of people are stock-piling face masks, preparing for an end of all ends. Calls to cease flights in and out of the affected countries are gaining more traction. And all the while, people continue to die in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea.

Source: Andre Carrilho

Source: Andre Carrilho

Let us not forget the reality of the on-going outbreak in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea.

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Let us step up to help end the suffering of humans, because we are humans and that is what we do.

Several weeks ago I introduced you all to the National Peace Corp Association’s Ebola relief fund. I am a member of the fund steering committee and have spent the past few weeks connecting with non-governmental organizations in Guinea to encourage their applications. We have received 32 project requests from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea — 16 from Guinea alone! And they are still coming in! These project requests all combat Ebola and directly-related issues.

Today, I get to announce the release of a microsite that I have been working on for the past two weeks along with the staff at NPCA. Please check it out and pass it along!

http://www.NPCAebolarelief.org

Since the launch of the fund last month we have passed the $10,000 mark in contributions, which continue to come in steadily. But demand for project funding is far outstripping the amount we’ve raised.  The 32 requests already received have a need totaling close to $95,000. We have planned to distribute available funding by November 1st.

john_moore_gettyimages

Source: John Moore/Getty Images

Ebola isn’t waiting, so why are you? Every day, every moment, this gets worse.

“The people who come help: we need them yesterday. So let them come tomorrow!” – President Ernest Bai Koroma, Republic of Sierra Leone

Can you help? Donate today.

People plan and God laughs

I close my eyes and instantly I can see it. It’s 5:00am and the sounds of the morning stir me; the long, unwavering chant of the call to prayer, the never-tiring rooster announcing his daily intentions, the gentle swish of broom meeting ground. I lay still in my morning sweat, half-drifting in and out of dreamworld until the noise of my family prods me out of bed. A quick splash of cool water on my face and I slip into today’s outfit. I unlock my heavy, metal door with three loud affirmations that I am ready for a new day in Guinea.

Click. Click. Click.

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But I open my eyes and it is 9:30am. I am in my room at my family’s house in Maryland. I have overslept.

This is the post that I never intended to write. The post that I never believed I’d have to write.

Things have been unfolding in slow motion for the past two months. Today it’s as if time has caught on to the trick it played on us and apologetically warped us back into reality; only the reality is horrid, is a smack on the face, is the full force of an explosion offered up to you in the words of an e-mail.

It’s with a heavy heart that we regret to inform you that sadly you will unfortunately not be returning.

I left Guinea with every intention of returning, every belief that my goodbye truly was temporary. We were removed from the Ebola outbreak at a time when it hardly seemed reason to go. Ebola hadn’t reached our villages, hadn’t affected our lives. Ebola hadn’t ravaged a region, sparked an international public health crisis, and defied all predictions of what Ebola might do.

I created this blog almost immediately after receiving my invitation to serve in Guinea (what can I say? I was very excited). The name “Guinean Dreams” seemed sophisticated and romantic to me. I had scoured dozens of blogs for information on life in Guinea and as I laid in bed, my dreams filled with the words of others. I was anxious. Ready to go, ready to serve, ready to learn.

People plan and God laughs.

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I served eight months in Guinea, a far cry from my planned 27. I learned more than I’ll ever be able to express, but I wanted more. I had not even begun to think about My Future, and now I find myself faced with it daily. Every night I dream of the Guinea I left behind.

I have a running list of things I should have done that now will never get ticked off. People I didn’t hug tightly enough, didn’t thank loudly and often enough. Work I wasn’t able to complete. Money I wasn’t able to give. People I couldn’t help.

Thinking about the what-if’s and the unfinished’s is a heartbreaking game to play. It’s up to me to begin this healing process by focusing on the things I did accomplish.

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I learned and spoke French and Susu every day. I lived with two beautiful families who took me into their lives and gave me love. I became a part of a close-knit community of people. I washed my clothes by hand. I fetched water from the well and carried it back on my head. I cooked rice and sauce, cleaned fish and chicken, and pounded rice into powder. I taught women how to make soap. I taught women how to cook more nutritious meals. I taught children English. I planted edible, nutritious trees all over my village. I implemented organic gardening techniques. I fasted for Ramadan and learned the 5 daily prayers of Islam. I became good friends with toddlers, teenagers, 20-somethings, and old men and women. I learned the importance of giving and sharing. I learned how to live with next to nothing. I rode a tiny, wooden canoe to an island with white beaches. I took bushtaxis through the lush, mountainous country side. I stared at the uncountable stars in the sky and prayed to God. I rode my bike up and down a jungle paradise and called it a normal day. I found more happiness and purpose and joy in my life than I’ve ever known.

I will, one day, return.

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For now, I’m working on getting money to local NGOs in the Ebola affected countries. I may be done with my Peace Corps service in Guinea, but I’m not done dreaming of her.

If you would like to donate, please click here.

Guinea will always be a part of me.

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Put resources in open hands: Give to local NGOs fighting Ebola

The National Peace Corps Association has started an Ebola relief fund that will be awarding monetary grants to local, community based NGOs in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia working with directly related Ebola issues. This may be working on outbreak containment with patients and their families, providing food to quarantined areas, caring for orphans and the elderly, or a number of other issues. Our first round of funding will be awarded November 1st. I am a member of the steering committee; we are staffed by RPCVs from Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia and coordinated by an international public health expert. Our goal is to help the people we love in the best way we know how — by empowering local communities.

Through its longstanding relationship with Women’s Campaign Internation, some of the recent donations from the Friends of Liberia have been used to provide relief supplies to quarantined families in Nimba County in north-central Liberia.

Through its longstanding relationship with Women’s Campaign Internation, some of the recent donations from the Friends of Liberia have been used to provide relief supplies to quarantined families in Nimba County in north-central Liberia.

Community based efforts have been the most effective in this outbreak as they already have trust and respect from the local population. Wouldn’t you trust your neighbor over a stranger? Peace Corps is all about living local, integrating, and working within the cultural context. This fund will continue that by giving locally. 100% of donations will go towards Ebola relief efforts in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia.

If you are looking for a way to get involved with this outbreak, please click here to make a donation to the NPCA Ebola Relief fund and encourage those you know to donate as well.

Michael Douglas Lives in Guinea

One of my good friends at site is named Douga. This is his nickname, which comes from his preferred name “Michael Douglass”. Yes, the American actor. I was put into contact with Douga from former PCVs who lived at my site. He’s a young guy, insanely funny, and very smart. He was trained in electrical repairs by a Chinese expat. He speaks multiple languages, draws, and is interested in philosophy.

What do you mean you don't see the resemblance?

What do you mean you don’t see the resemblance?

On a day without any meetings, I would bike down to the phone charging center he worked at and hang out with him and our other friends all day, laughing the hours away and discussing life and politics in Guinea.

Before I left I gave Douga all my stockpiled chocolate. He’s really into Hershey’s. It was only one week home in America until I received a call from him – “Uh, Sara? I ate all the chocolate. When are you going to be back with more?”

Unfortunately, Douga has had to wait on that.

We talk regularly on Facebook. He travels between our village and the capitol frequently, looking for phones and computers to repair for money. As such, he’s got a pretty good hold on what’s going on with the Ebola outbreak. Although our conversations generally center around “How’s the family?” and “Man, I miss you!” I always try and get the on-the-ground perspective from Douga. Today, I was saddened by what he said.

“The city is dirty, the people have no work, there is no money, the health infrastructure is weak, the government has no money, all of this now leads to possible famine.”

He mentioned how happy he was to hear about the 3,000 U.S. troops being sent to West Africa. Unfortunately these troops will be directed to Liberia. Douga hadn’t realized that.

“All the troops are for Liberia? Then that’s another thing. We are screwed, my dear, because Ebola is not forgiving.

You know how it is here. The available time is small, life is short, laziness is vast, and Ebola separates us.

Tell Obama that we, too, want to live very much.”

Hell in the Hot Zone

Vanity Fair has written one of the most moving, detailed, honest reports about how the Ebola outbreak began in Guinea and went unnoticed for three and a half months.

As the Ebola epidemic rages, two questions have emerged: How did the deadly virus escape detection for three months? And why has a massive international effort failed to contain it? Traveling to Meliandou, a remote Guinean village and the likely home of Patient Zero, Jeffrey E. Stern tracks the virus’s path—and the psychological contagion that is still feeding the worst Ebola outbreak in history.

Click to read.